Comparing the Thickness and Strength of Different Gloves

15 Jun.,2022

During the course of our work, our hands may encounter a variety of strange and dangerous situations. This means that the nitrile glove that may suit your needs for one job will not provide adequate protection for another task. We will explain the industry terminology and provide you with a helpful guide to keep in mind when trying to find the best glove for your needs.

 

During the course of our work, our hands may encounter a variety of strange and dangerous situations. This means that the that may suit your needs for one job will not provide adequate protection for another task.
Generally speaking, in the safety industry, everyone automatically associates thickness with quality and strength. However, when it comes to gloves, especially disposable gloves, this is not the case. We will explain the industry terminology and provide you with a helpful guide to keep in mind when trying to find the best glove for your needs.

 

Comparing the Thickness and Strength of Different Gloves

 

Glove Thickness Selection

The thickness of a glove is not a reliable indicator of strength, quality or puncture and chemical resistance. Disposable gloves, in particular, are easy to make "thick", but if they are inexpensive to manufacture or made by someone who does not understand the intricacies of glove manufacturing, "thick" gloves can still break or snag or puncture easily when pulled.  
The best way to do this is to call and chat with a glove expert , they will most likely find out which glove is best for you and then they will find the best way for you to try the glove. YERUN offers professional suggestions and welcome your enquiry.
Once you put your hands on the gloves and test them, it quickly becomes apparent that these are the better gloves. Physically comparing and testing gloves is the best way to find the best glove for you. Sometimes, however, you may need to use technical specifications and/or certifications to compare gloves.

 

Glove Strength Indicators

There is no standardized test for measuring and comparing glove strength. Because you need to use gloves in so many different workplaces for so many different protection needs, it is difficult to apply a general rule to determine the "strength" of a glove. This is why the EN standard was created, which tests for a variety of specific hazards and can be used as a guide to determine how "strong" a glove is.

The best indicators of glove strength are tests for: puncture resistance, tear resistance, abrasion resistance, cut resistance, and chemical resistance.   


EN388 was created for mechanical risk. Mechanical risk is defined as; the puncture, tear, abrasion and cut resistance of a glove.
Puncture resistance is the ability of a glove to resist puncture hazards. The higher the number, the greater the resistance. 
Tear resistance is the likelihood that a glove will tear when it comes in contact with an obstacle or pull hazard. The higher the number, the more resistant the glove.
Abrasion resistance is the degree to which the glove will withstand abrasion hazards. The higher the number, the more resistant the glove is to rough surfaces.
Cut resistance is the degree to which the glove withstands the danger of sharp cuts. The higher the number, the more resistant the glove is to sharp edges, materials, knives, etc. 

 

Comparing the Thickness and Strength of Different Gloves


In summary, the best way to compare gloves in terms of thickness and strength is to physically test them. If this is not possible, then you should use the EN/AS/NZS standard. Remember, nothing is more important than your safety, so be sure to check that the manufacturer has been tested by an independent third party.


If you have any questions about your current gloves, please contact our glove experts who will provide you with the correct safety solution.