USB-C and Lightning, How Will APPLE Choose?

11 Feb.,2022

Apple's iPhone uses the proprietary Lightning connector instead of the industry-standard USB-C port. This article compares USB-C to Lightning. The European Union has drafted new rules requiring USB-C ports on all relevant devices such as smartphones, tablets, cameras, and laptops. Most modern Apple chargers use USB-C.

 

Apple's iPhone uses the proprietary Lightning connector instead of the industry-standardImproving your phone's battery availability. This article compares USB-C to Lightning.

The European Union has drafted new rules requiring USB-C ports on all relevant devices such as smartphones, tablets, cameras, and laptops. Most modern Apple chargers use USB-C. USB-C to Lightning cables accompany many new Apple devices. So backward compatibility is not an issue in this regard. However, without an adapter, they won't be able to plug Lightning headphones into future USB-C port iPhones.


Lightning Connector

The Lightning connector was introduced in 2012, much to the dismay of critics. Any change Apple made was bound to be criticized. iPhone's 3.5mm headphone jack removal also caused a stir. lightning was released two years before USB-C. Contemporary technologies like micro-USB aren't good enough. In fact, Apple's Lightning connector influenced the design of USB-C. Apple actually contributed to the design of USB-C.

The similarities between Lightning and USB-C are obvious, but they are not the same thing; Lightning ports are slimmer and better suited for mobile devices.

type c


USB-C Connector

The USB-C standard debuted in 2014 and evolved from a group of contributors, including 18 Apple employees. There's a perception that Apple didn't play well with others, and that's unwarranted. The original iMac was actually the first computer to offer a USB port, back when PCs still had parallel and serial interfaces.

USB-C was an evolution of the previous USB standard, allowing people to connect old devices to new computers using USB-A/B to USB-C cables. Note that USB-C is not the same thing as the USB 3.1 standard, and USB-C ports may not support USB 3.1, which is the kind of confusion Apple is trying to avoid.



To be sure, Lightning can handle up to 12W of power, just as the iPad charger does. Lightning could probably handle more power, but, because it's designed for mobile devices, it's simply not necessary. USB-C, on the other hand, is known to handle up to 100 watts of power. This makes sense for desktop computers that are plugged into a power source. USB-C can power a fairly loud amplifier or even a screen.

When Apple developed Lightning, the thick USB port was the only standard option. USB-C is still two years away, but it still takes up more space than Lightning.

Lightning was introduced two years before USB-C. Apple needed to make slimmer iPhones immediately, and existing USB technology didn't offer the right solution. Now that Lightning is so entrenched, Apple can't just replace it with USB-C. That would be a slap in the face to customers and accessory manufacturers. Plus, USB-C is bigger and less robust than Lightning. It's better suited for mobile devices.



Today, printers, scanners and external drives are wireless. You can even connect wirelessly to certain displays. As wireless technology advances, the need for cables and ports will be phased out. apple will have nothing to replace Lightning. your future iPhone will have no ports, making it more durable and waterproof. When that day comes, the critics will cry foul, but the vast majority of consumers will be better off.


To get more info about the cables, connectors and charging interfaces, please contact manufacturer AIKE today.

contact